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mnunes810

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About mnunes810

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  1. mnunes810

    Tint Removal on a 99 Infiniti G20

    not sure if anyone has suggested this yet; i don't feel like reading. here is a simple/ effective process you can use: 1) split a big black garbage bag down the seems, so that it makes a big rectangle 2) wet the outside of the window, place the bag on it, cut it to shape to fit to the edges 3) on a sunny day, face the back end of the car to the sun, so that the glass will recieve optimal light 4) spray tinted (inside) side w/ windex 5) place bag on the windex-soaked section 6) this is the tricky part- using something flat with a flexible edge, such as a small squeegie or bondo-applicator, you must push all air bubbles out so there is a seamless fit between the bag and the glass 7) let sit for 2 or 3 hours 8)remove bag 9)film should peel off now, leaving behind a little glue. this can now be scrubbed off via one of those coarse green scrub pads, as the amonia combined with the heat from the sun has softened it dramatically. btw- this is just for the back glas so you don't damage the defrosters. just use windex and a razor blade for the door windows. good luck
  2. mnunes810

    fuel guage ackin' bad

    I think maybe it is a relay, but I am not sure yet.
  3. mnunes810

    fuel guage ackin' bad

    working on my pet project, 1995 toyota camry, 2.2 4 cyl automatic. When the key is in "accesory" position my fuel guage gives a reading. However, when I start the engine, it falls back to zero.
  4. mnunes810

    Rodents vs. Camry

    Had some mice living in a car I am working on. They had vacated the car by the time I got it. It appears they damaged some wiring. The two things that no longer work are the fuel guage and the cooling fans in fron of the motor. The previous owner informed me that the fuel guage was working before the mice to up residence. As for the fans, I only assume that they were a casualty of the same incident. Where do these groups of wires trace through this particular car? (BTW, car was free. I would never buy a literal "rats nest"
  5. mnunes810

    Toyota Camry Trans Fluid? Trans Failurre?

    changed fluid, new filter and seal. (couldn't buy just the seal at my parts shop) i think the issue was low fluid combined with being super cold. car still doesn't shift into overdrive until trans has warmed up, though. i hear that's common, but i don't like it..
  6. mnunes810

    1998 cavalier overheating

    maybe his overheating problem worsened... tragically..
  7. mnunes810

    1998 cavalier overheating

    are your coolant levels good? any rust in the radiator? how about your water pump?
  8. mnunes810

    Toyota Camry Trans Fluid? Trans Failurre?

    Ok, if Mr. Taikip can get 15 replies, I know I can at least get one or two more bits of feedback on a legitimate question...
  9. mnunes810

    Toyota Camry Trans Fluid? Trans Failurre?

    I'm a Fahrenheit guy, so I'll have to pull up the conversion charts. However, I can tell you it was mid to low twenties. I all ready know this issue, whatever it may be, came to surface due to the temperature because it has not happened before, or since. (and that is the only time I have operated the car in those temperatures)
  10. mnunes810

    A site to learn mechanics?

    between a chiltons repair manual for the vehicle being worked on, and a good car forum like this one, you can do anything. granted, you have the tools. better get a big bag, haha. Sockets, wrenches, (metric, or standard, depending on the vehicle) a multimeter, a compression tester comes in handy eventually, too. And when it comes to more specialized jobs, requiring specialized tools (replacing ball joints, for example) you can rent them from an auto parts store, such as o'reilys or autozone. I have used an extremely technical method to learn what I have thus far, and you can do the same. it consists of (1) hearing a funny sound, or noticing something has changed about my vehicles behavior. (2) asking "what could this be?" followed by (3) how do I fix it? So easy, a caveman could do it.. the main thing is pay attention to your vehicle! it will give you warning signs when something is amuck. look for stuff like bad mpg, smoke, weak acceleration, performing badly in the cold/heat, smut all over your tail pipe, vibrations, and pulling to the left or right. Also, you can save yourself a ton of money by learning the ins and outs of general maintenance stuff like how to change your oil and filter, how to change break pads, how to rotate tires, et cetera.. when you think you want to try doing a job, just post a thread. and again, one of those chilton manuals will allow you to understand and visually see the anatomy of your car or truck without tearing it apart.
  11. be sure to add replacement parts cost
  12. Still putting my 1995 toyota camry through the paces to see if it is worth keeping. A few mornings ago, we had an unusually cold day for southern mississippi. So cold, in fact, that we had several inches of snow on the ground. Some buddies along with my self all hopped in the camry to go for a ride, but when I put the car into drive, it did not go. I pushed the rpms up to about 2700, and the car began to creep. After a few more minutes of allowing the car to warm up (on its own, I didn't rev it any more) all was back to normal. Today, I checked the trans fluid after a 15 minute jaunt, and it was rather low, for "hot" operation (half an inch below the mark, ball park). What I need to figure out is if the incident friday morning was a fluid- issue, something else, or if she's soon to be a goner. Thanks, you all. BTW- automatic transmission, 1995 camry le, 2.2 4cyl, 173,000 mi.
  13. mnunes810

    '99 Ranger vs. '95 Camry

    the fact of the matter is I will get more $$ for the ranger, it is in better overall condition. again, no fluid leaks, e.t.c. As I am currently enrolling in college, cash is something I am in great need of. with a little work, the camry could be a fine car, however, I doubt I would ever see more than $1200 if I sold it. I am starting to think the camry may hold more value for me than for my wallet, if that makes any sense. It is a hundred times more comfortable to drive than my truck, and cruise control is a blessing on the interstate, where I do the most of my cruising. Btw, a trunk would also be nice, because I have recently acquired a girl friend, which means I need a passenger seat that isn't full of junk. Looks like I answered my own question, but thanks for the comments.
  14. mnunes810

    '99 Ranger vs. '95 Camry

    essentially a mazda b series being a good or bad thing? I have to keep one of the two. The goal here is to make a little cash rather than invest the money into another vehicle.
  15. I recently inherited a 1995 Toyota Camry LE. My current vehicle is a 1999 Ford Ranger XLT that I have driven for going on one year. I am 20 years old and do not have the funds nor the need to own two vehicles, therefore, one must go. I have researched both vehicles, and there is good and bad to be said about each one. My findings are making this an extremely difficult decision, so I need some advice/ opinions. Here is a breakdown of each vehicle as well as their condition: 1999 Ford Ranger XLT- Sport Package, Step-side, Single Cab 2wd, 2.5L 4cyl/ Auto Transmission 172,000 mi Pros- Useful when it is time to move. Somewhat attractive in my opinion. Reasonable acceleration, great stopping power, Uncluttered engine compartment, cheap parts. I know many people have issues with this particular make, but I have not. At 172,000 miles the truck is yet to encounter any engine or transmission problems. No fluid leaks. New tires. Cons- Small cab, can only carry 1 passenger comfortably. Fuel economy (22-24), rough ride/ noisy driving experience. No cruise control. Ford reputation, supposedly the worst year for the Ranger. 1995 Toyota Camry LE LE, 4 door sedan Fwd, 2.2L 4cyl/ Auto Transmission 173,000 mi Pros- Roomy, oh so roomy. Smooth ride, feels like a Cadillac compared to the Ranger. Room for passengers, big trunk. Better MPG. Comfortable interior. Resale value. Power everything. Cruise Control. Runs/ Shifts great. Toyota reputation and supposedly a good year for the Camry. Cons- Some fluid leaks from trans pan & oil pan gaskets. Needs new CV joint ($50 approx.) and rear strut ($60 approx). No truck bed, no trailer hitch will complicate moving. Parts are more expensive overall. Cluttered engine compartment.
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