Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
greatwhiteshark000

I Am Constantly Denting my Rims Suggestions!!

14 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

I drive in NYC where there are a lot of potholes. I try to avoid as many as possible and sometimes I don't see one sneak up on me and my car goes down.

 

I know that my rim that hit the pothole got dented and I get so peeved. Is there a way that this doesn't occur like stronger material for rims or something to protect the edges?

 

How do people drive and get no dents on any of the rims in this pothole ridden city.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have rims and I live in Pa where Penn DOT does nothing for the roads but all I can say is dodge the holes and just keep your eyes open. Also what size tires do you have. I have 205/45/16 and I know I've hit a couple holes and thankfully nothing has gone wrong. If you have 40's all I can say is maybe move up to 45 or 50's so you have a little more tire between the rim and the road it might help a little. I know a guy who hit one hole and dent three of his 18inch rims that cost a lot of money. So all you can do is be careful. Hope that helps. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the 17incher tires, stock Eclipse GT rims. Is there a type of rim metal that won't dent thats like made of Military titanium?

 

I mean its the worst you don't see a pothole and bam you know for sure its dented. What about rims that curve back into the tire?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Magnesium wheels are very light, but are brittle. Even though magnesium burns (and can't be put out with normal means), fire isn't a problem with wheels. But they might crack much easier than aluminum or steel alloys.

 

Hitting things with your wheels will bend them, no way around that. You have 3000+lbs of force behind the wheel when it hits whatever object (in your case potholes, but curbs are just as deadly), so it's gonna bend (or break), regardless of what it's made of.

 

The only thing that protects wheels, other than avoiding obstacles as best you can, is taller tires with more sidewall cushion. That's why offroad tires have so much sidewall height. It cushions against rocks and debris. offroad conditions require offroad equipment. After driving around DC, I can see why so many people drive SUVs anymore. Back home in Seattle, we have smoother offroad trails than the streets around here...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  
- Back to Top -

×
×
  • Create New...